Tag Archives: Storage

Hands-on with VNXe 3200: Initial setup


Here I go again. About two years ago I started writing a series of blog posts about my hands-on experience with newly released VNXe 3300. At that time the VNXe 3300 was just released and there wasn’t that much documentation out there. So I did lots of testing and had to make my own “best practices”. The previous blog series is one of the reasons why I now have a chance to test and write about the VNXe 3200.

On June 10 Chad published this blog post: “Summer Gift Part 2 – 10 VNXe arrays free to play with for volunteers!”. I was surprised to find myself mentioned on the post and even more surprised to find out that one of the devices was reserved for me. So while I was on vacation last week the test unit arrived:

  • VNXe 3200 – 2U Form Factor/12 Drive DPE
    • 3.5” Drives
    • 6 x 600GB 15K Pack
    • 3 X 100GB eMLC Flash Drives (for FAST auto-tiering)
    • 2 X 100GB eMLC Flash Drives (for FAST Cache)
    • 9TB Raw Capacity

VNXe 3200 is basically a combination of the new VNX MCx multicore technology and the old VNXe OE/Unisphere. I won’t go through all the new features but there are a few worth mentioning:

  • Multi-core RAID (MCR), Multi-core Cache (MCC), Multi-core Flash (MCF)
  • “Active/Active” file
  • Single container for block and file
  • Linux-based platform

More details about the new features on EMC VNXe Series website.

Unboxing

Well not much to write about this: Install rack rails, lay DPE on those, connect cables and the VNXe was ready for configuration. However, this was something I hadn’t seen before with the previous VNXe:

power

Quick look in the installation documentation and it revealed to be a power adapter for the front LED-lights: image

Initial setup 

There have been several new versions of the VNXe OE since my first VNXe blog post but the “Unisphere Configuration Wizard” still looks similar. Going through the wizard takes about 10 minutes but I skipped most of the configurations as usual. I prefer to upgrade the VNXe to the latest software version before I do any configurations to new devices. After the configuration wizard is completed you will get a popup and you will be directed to the EMC support website where the latest version can be downloaded.

softwareupgrade

Conclusions

Even though there is totally new hardware running under the hood Unisphere still looks and feels the same as on the latest software vesion on VNXe 3100/3150/3300. I still agree that VNXe is simple to install and configure. Of course I haven’t configured any storage pools or iscsi servers yet. I’ll cover those on the next posts. Also performance and some of the new features will be reviewed later.

Software version 2.0.3:

unisphere

 

Software version 2.4.2:

242_1

Software version 3.0.1:

301_1

 

 

 

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VNXe OE 2.4 and 2.5″ form factor disks


Once again I had a chance to play around with some shiny new hardware. And once again the hardware was VNXe 3300 but this time it was something that I hadn’t seen before: 2.5” form factor with 46 600GB 10k disks. If you have read about the new RAID configurations in OE  2.4.0 you might figure out what kind of configuration I have in my mind with this HW.

In this post I will go through some of the new features introduced in VNXe OE 2.4.0, do some configuration comparisons between 3.5” and 2.5” form factors and also between VNXe and VNX. Of course I had to do some performance testing as well with the new RAID configurations so I will introduce the results later in this post.

VNXe OE 2.4.0.20932 release notes

Customizable Dashboard

Along with the new OE came the ability to customize UI dashboard. The look of the Unisphere UI on new or upgraded VNXe is now similar to Unisphere Remote. You can customize the dashboard and also create new tabs and add desired view blocks to the tabs.

VNXe dashboard

vnxe_dashboard1

Jobs

Some of the operations are now added as background jobs and you don’t have to wait that the operation is finished. Steps of the operations are also more detailed when viewed from the jobs page. Number of active jobs is also shown next to the alerts on the status bar dependent on what page are you on.

jobs

New RAID configurations

Now this is one of the enhancements that I’ve been waiting for because VNXe can only utilize four RAID groups in a pool. So with the previous OE this would mean that datastore in 6+1 RAID 5 pool could only utilize 28 disks. Now with the 10+1 RAID 5 pool structure datastores can utilize as many as 44 disks. This also means increased max iops per datastore. 3.5” form factor 15k disk RAID 5 pool max iops is increased from ~4900 to ~7700 and with 2.5” form factor 10k disk RAID 5 pool max iops is increased from ~3500 to ~5500. Iops is not the only thing to be looked at. Size of the pool matters too and not to forget the rack space that the VNXe will use. While I was sizing the last VNXe that we ordered I made this comparison chart to compare the pool size, iops and rack space with different disk form factors in VNX and VNXe.

comparison

Interesting setup with the VNXe 3150 and 2.5” form factor disks is the 21TB and 5500 iops packed in 4U rack space. VNXe 3300 with same specs would take 5U space and VNX5300 would take 6U space. Of course the SP performance is a bit different between these arrays but so is the price.

Performance

I’ve already posted some performance test results from VNX 3100 and 3300 so I added those results to the charts for comparison. I’ve also ran some tests on VNX 5300 that I haven’t posted yet and also added those results on the charts.

avgmbps1

avgmbps2

avgiops1

avgiops2

avglatency1

avglatency2

There is a significant difference in the max throughput between 1G and 10G modules on VNXe. Then again the real life test results are quite similar.

Disclaimer

These results reflect the performance of the environment that the tests were ran in. Results may vary depending on the hardware and how the environment is configured.


EMC Elect – badge of honor


Two months ago EMC Elect – community driven brand recognition program – and its ten first “founding” members were introduced. The idea of the program is similar to Microsoft MVP and VMware vExpert programs.

Two of the masterminds behind this program are Matthew Brender and Mark Browne. Here is Matthew’s short summary about the program.

EMCElectSummary

Today EMC announced the first 75 community members that were selected to the EMC Elect 2013 program by their contributions in the past year. I’m very honored to be one of those 75 top contributors that were selected. Thanks to all my followers and other community members! Here is the official list of all members: The EMC Elect of 2013 – Official Directory.

EMCElect


Hands-on with VNXe 3100


On Friday before Christmas we ordered VNXe 3100 with 21 600GB SAS drives and it was delivered in less than two weeks. Exactly two weeks after the order was placed we had the first virtual machine running on it.

Last year I made a seven post series about my hands-on experience with VNXe 3300. This is my first VNXe 3100 that I’m working with and also my first VNXe unboxing. With the 3300s I relied on my colleagues to do all the physical installation because I was 5000 miles away from the datacenter. With this one I did everything by myself from unboxing to installing the first VM.

My previous posts are still valid so in this post I’ll try to concentrate on the differences between the 3300 and 3100. Will Huber has really good posts on unboxing and configuring the VNXe 3100. During the installation I also found a couple of problems from the latest OE (2.1.3.16008). I will describe one of the issues in this post and for the bigger thing I will do a separate post.

I will also do a follow up post about the performance differences between 3300 and 3100 when I get all the tests done. I’m also planning to do some tests with FusionIO IOturbine and I will post those results when I get the card and the tests done.

Initial setup

VNXe and the additional DAE came in two pretty heavy boxes. Which box to open first? Well the box that you need to open first tells you that:

So like a kid on Christmas day I opened the boxes and the first thing that I see is this big poster explaining the installation procedure. The rack rails are easy and quick to install. The arrays are quite heavy but managed to lift those on the rack also by myself.

After doing all the cabling it was time to power on the VNXe. Before doing this you need to decide how you are going to do the initial configuration (assigning IP). In my previous post I mentioned that there are two options for doing it using VNXe ConnectionUtility: auto discovery or manual configuration. With the manual configuration the VNXe ConnectionUtility basically creates a text file on the USB stick that will be inserted into the VNXe before the first boot. A faster way is to skip the download and installation of the 57mb package and create the file manually on a USB stick. So get a USB stick, create IW_CONF.txt file on the USB stick and add the following content to it replacing the [abcd] variables with your own:

TYPE=CONFIGURE

PROTO_VERSION=1

FRIENDLYNAME=[VNXENAME]

MGMTADDRESSA1=[IP ADDRESS]

MGMTMASK1=[NETMASK]

GATEWAY=[GATEWAY]

After that just insert the USB into the VNXe and power it on. The whole process of unboxing, cabling and powering on took me about one and a half hours.

While the VNXe was starting up I downloaded the latest Operating Environment (2.1.3.16008) so that I was ready to run the upgrade after the system was up and running. After the first login ‘Unisphere Configuration Wizard’ will show up and you need to go through several steps. I skipped some of those (creating iscsi server, creating storage pool, licensing) and started the upgrade process (see my previous post).

After the upgrade was done I logged back in and saw the prompt about the license. I clicked the “obtain license” button and a new browser window opened and following the instructions I got the license file. I’ve heard complaints about IE and the licensing page not working. The issue might be browser popup blocker. It is also stated on the license page that the popup blocker should be disabled.

After this quick LACP trunk configuration on the switch and ESXi side iSCSI configurations I was ready to provision some storage and do some testing.

Issues that I found out

During the testing I found an issue with the MTU settings when using iSCSI. A problem that will cause datastores to be disconnected from ESXi. Even reverting back to the original MTU settings the datastores can’t be connected to ESXi and new datastores can’t be created. I will describe this in a separate post.

The other issue that I found was more cosmetic. When having two iSCSI servers on the same SP and provisioning the first VMware storage on the second iSCSI server Unisphere will give the following error:

For some reason VNXe can’t initiate the VMFS datastore creation process on ESXi. But LUN is still visible on ESXi and VMFS datastore can be manually created. So it’s not a big issue but still annoying.

Conclusions

There seems to be small improvements to the latest operation environment (2.1.3.16008). Provisioning storage to ESX server feels a bit faster and also VMFS datastore is also created every time if having only one iSCSI server on SP. In the previous OE the VMFS datastore was created about 50% of the time when storage was provisioned to ESXi.

In the previous posts I have mentioned how easy and simple VNXe is to configure and the 3100 is no different from the 3300 from that point of view. Overall VNXe 3100 seems to be a really good product considering the fairly low price of it. A quick look at the performance tests shows quite similar results to the ones that I got from the 3300. I will do a separate post about the performance comparison of these two VNXes.

Although it is good to keep in mind the difference between marketing material and the reality. VNXe 3300 is advertised to have 12GB memory per SP but in reality it has only 256MB read cache and 1GB write cache. 3100 is advertised to have 8GB memory but it has only 128MB read cache and 768MB write cache.


Hands-on with VNXe 3300 Part 7: Wrap up


When I started writing this series my first plan was to just make four quick posts about my experience with EMC VNXe 3300. After I started going further into detail on the configuration I realized that I couldn’t get everything that I wanted to express to fit in four posts. So I ended up adding three more posts to the series. Still, with this series I’m just touching the surface of VNXe 3300. There are so many functionalities that I didn’t go through or didn’t even mention. That was also my intention with this series. I wanted to write about my experience and look in to those features that I would implement.

  1. Initial setup and configuration
  2. iSCSI and NFS servers
  3. Software update
  4. Storage pools
  5. Storage provisioning
  6. VNXe performance
  7. Wrap up

EMCWORLD_39

Simple, Efficient, Affordable

Those are the words that EMC uses for marketing VNXe and I can mostly agree that those are accurate adjectives for VNXe. In the first part I also wanted to add the adjective “easy” among those words. A user can do the initial setup and VNXe can be operational in less than an hour depending on the software version. Unisphere UI layout is also very user friendly and illustrative. Configuration and updating SW are easy and simple.

EMCWORLD_42

Customers buying VNXe just based on the marketing material might face a big surprise when looking in to the actual memory configuration. Yes, VNXe has 12GB memory per SP, but only 256MB is dedicated for read cache and 1GB dedicated for write cache.

Configuration considerations

Even though it is easy and simple to get VNXe up and running and to start provisioning storage this doesn’t mean that the planning phase can be ignored. User can easily be in a really bad situation and the only way out is to delete all datastores to do the proper reconfigurations. Creating only one iSCSI server and putting all datastores on that one server creates a situation where all the I/O goes through one SP and the other SP is idle. Depending on the ESX iSCSI settings only one network port on VNXe could be utilized even if a four port trunk was configured. Fixing this problem is not as easy as creating it. VNXe doesn’t allow changing the datastore iSCSI server after the datastore is created. To assign a different iSCSI server for a datastore it has to be deleted and recreated. This is, again, one issue that I’m hoping will be fixed.

When using four 1GB ports my suggestion would be to configure NIC aggregation on VNXe as I described in part 2. For the ESX configuration I would suggest reading the detailed comment Ken posted in part 6 about the ESX iSCSI configurations. What comes to the VNXe iSCSI and datastore configurations I ended up creating equal number of datastores for each SP and also dedicating one iSCSI server per datastore to get the most out of the four port trunk.

Issues

The issues that I faced during the configuration were mostly minor usability flaws and some of those were already fixed in the latest software version. The biggest issue that I found was that the VNXe had to be powered off before a software update if it had been running for more than 42 days. I’ve discussed these issues with EMC and hopefully they will be fixed in the future releases.

Conclusions

Despite all the criticism I think that VNXe 3300 is a great product and it will be even better when the few small flaws are fixed. I’m really looking forward to seeing what kind of new features will be introduced in the future software releases. Chad Sakac gave a hint on his blog post about FAST VP support coming in to VNXe at some point. He also mentioned that VAAI (file) and SRM support will be coming out still this year.

I can see some new VNXe 3300 related blog posts in my near future but I think it is time to close this series and keep the new posts separate. If you have any questions about my experience with VNXe or other general questions about it please leave a comment.


Hands-on with VNXe 3300 Part 6: Performance


Now that the VNXe is installed, configured and also some storage has been provisioned to ESXi hosts it is time to look at the performance. Like I mentioned in the first post I had already gathered some test results from CX4-240 using Iometer and I wanted to make similar tests with VNXe so that the results could be comparable.

Hands-on with VNXe 3300 series:

  1. Initial setup and configuration
  2. iSCSI and NFS servers
  3. Software update
  4. Storage pools
  5. Storage provisioning
  6. VNXe performance
  7. Wrap up

Test environment CX4-240

  • EMC CX4-240
  • Dell PE M710HD Blade server
  • Two 10G iSCSI NICs with total of four paths between storage and ESXi. Round robin path selection policy enabled for each LUN with two active I/O  paths
  • Jumbo Frames enabled
  • ESXi 4.1U1
  • Virtual Win 2003 SE SP2 (1vCPU and 2GB memory)

Test environment VNXe 3300

  • EMC VNXe 3300
  • Dell PE M710HD Blade server
  • Two 10Gb iSCSI NICs with total of two paths between storage and ESXi. Round robin path selection policy enabled for each LUN with two active I/O paths (see Trunk restrictions and Load balancing)
  • Jumbo Frames enabled
  • ESXi 4.1U1
  • Virtual Win 2003 SE SP2 (1vCPU and 2GB memory)

Iometer Configuration

I used Iometer setup described in VMware’s Recommendations for Aligning VMFS Partitions (page 7) document.

Disk configuration

I had to shorten the explanations on the charts so here are the definitions:

  • CX4 FC 15D
    • 15 15k FC Disk RAID5 Pool on CX4-240 connected with iSCSI
  • CX4 SATA 25D
    • 25 7.2k SATA Disk RAID5 Pool on CX240 connected with iSCSI
  • VNXe 21D 2.0.3
    • 21 15k SAS Disk RAID 5 (3×6+1) Pool on VNXe 3300 connected with iSCSI. VNXe Software version 2.0.3
  • VNXe 28D 2.0.3
    • 28 15k SAS Disk RAID 5 (4×6+1) Pool on VNXe 3300. connected with iSCSI. VNXe Software version 2.0.3
  • VNXe 28D 2.1.0
    • 28 15k SAS Disk RAID 5 (4×6+1) Pool on VNXe 3300 connected with iSCSI. VNXe Software version 2.1.0
  • VNXe RG 2.1.0
    • 7 15k SAS RAID5 (6+1) RG on VNXe connected with iSCSI. VNXe Software version 2.1.0
  • VNXe 28D NFS
    • 28 15k SAS RAID 5 (4×6+1) Pool on VNXe 3300 connected with NFS. VNXe Software version 2.1.0

100Gb thick LUN was created to each pool and RG where 20Gb virtual disk was stored. This 20Gb virtual disk was presented to the virtual Windows server that was used to conduct the test. Partition to this disk was created using diskpart command ’create partition primary align=1024′ and partition was formatted with a 32K allocation size.

Trunk restrictions

Before I go through the results I want to address the limitation with the trunk between VNXe and the 10Gb switch that it is connected to. Even though there are 4Gb (4x1Gb) trunk between the storage and the switch the maximum throughput is only the throughput of one physical port.

While I was running the tests I had SSH connection open to VNXe and I ran netstat -i -c command to see what was going on with the trunk and individual ports. The first screen capture is taken while 8k sequential read test was running. You can see that all the traffic is going through that one port:

The second screen capture is taken while the VNXe was in production and several virtual machines were accessing the disk. In this case the load is balanced randomly between the physical ports:

Load balancing

VNXe 3300 is active/active array but doesn’t support ALUA. This means that LUN can only be accessed through one SP. One iSCSI/NFS server can only have one IP and this IP can only be tied to one port or trunk. Also LUN can only be served by one iSCSI/NFS server. So there will be only one path from the switch to VNXe. Round robin path selection policy can be enabled on ESX side but this will only help to balance the load between the ESX NICs. Even without the trunk round robin can’t be used to balance the load between the four VNXe ports.

Test results

Each Iometer test was ran twice and the results are the average of those two test runs. If the results were not similar enough (i.e. several hundred difference in IOps) then a third test was ran and the results are the average of those three runs.

Same as previous but without NFS results:

Average wait time

Conclusions

The first thing that caught my eye was the difference between VNXe 28 disk pool and 7 disk RG on the random write test. Quote from my last post about the pool structure:

When LUN is created it will be placed on the RAID group (RG) that is the least utilized from a capacity point of view. If the LUN created is larger than the free space on an individual RG the LUN will be then extended across multiple RGs but there is no striping involved.

The tests were ran on 100Gb LUN so it should fit in one RG if the information that I got would be correct. So comparing the pool and the results from one RG random write test it seems that even smaller LUNs are divided across multiple RGs.

Another interesting detail is the difference of the software version 2.0.3 and 2.1.0. Looking at the difference of these results it is obvious that the software version has a big effect on the performance.

NFS storage performance with random write was really bad. But with the 1k sequential read it surprised giving out 30000 iops. Based on these test I would stick with the iSCSI and maybe look at the NFS again after the next software version.

Overall VNXe is performing very well compared to CX. With this configuration the VNXe it is hitting the limits of the one physical port. This could be fixed by adding 10Gb I/O modules. Would be nice run the same test with the 10Gb I/O modules.

We are coming to an end of my hands-on series and I’ll be wrapping up the series in the next post.

[Update 2/17/2012] Updated NFS performance results with VNXe 3100 and OE 2.1.3.16008: VNXe 3100 performance

Disclaimer

These results reflect the performance of the environment that the tests were ran in. Results may vary depending on the hardware and how the environment is configured.


Hands-on with VNXe 3300 Part 5: Storage provisioning


When provisioning storage on VNXe there are many options depending on the host type: Microsoft Exchange, Shared folders, Generic iSCSI, VMware or Hyper-V . Because this VNXe is only going to serve VMware ESXi hosts I’m going to concentrate on that part. I will go through provisioning storage from VNXe and also using VSI Unified Storage Management Plug-in.

Hands-on with VNXe 3300 series [list updated 9/23/2011]:

  1. Initial setup and configuration
  2. iSCSI and NFS servers
  3. Software update
  4. Storage pools
  5. Storage provisioning
  6. VNXe performance
  7. Wrap up

iSCSI datastore

In the last part a storage pool was created. The next step is to create datastores on it and provision those to the hosts. There are two options when provisioning datastores for VMware from VNXe: VMware datastore or generic iSCSI. When using the VMware storage VNXe will automatically configure the iSCSI targets to selected ESX hosts and also create the VMFS datastore. If generic iSCSI is created then all those steps have to be done manually to each ESX. I really recommend using the VMware storage from these two options. VMware storage can be created from Storage – VMware storage.

At this point only iSCSI server was configured so the only option was to create a VMFS datastore.

The next step is to select the iSCSI server and the size for the datastore. When creating the first datastore it really doesn’t matter which iSCSI server is selected. If the iSCSI_A (on SP A) server is selected for the first datastore then iSCSI_B (on SP B) should be selected for the second datastore to balance the load on the SP’s. When selecting the iSCSI server on SP A this means that all the datastore I/O will go through the SP A. If all the datastores are placed on one SP there could be a situation where the whole VNXe performance is impacted because all I/O goes through that SP and the other SP is idle. So it is important to balance the datastores between SPs. VNXe is not doing this automatically so the user has to manually do this when creating datastores. If datastores are distributed between the SPs and the other SP fails all the datastores on the failed SP’s iSCSI server are moved to the other SP. When the failed SP comes back online all the datastores originally located on it are moved back.

There is an option to configure protection for the storage. Because this datastore is only for testing I chose not to configure the protection.

Step 5 is to select the hosts that the datastore will be attached to. Datastore can be connected to a specific iSCSI initiator on ESX server by expanding the host and selecting Datastore access for the specific IQN. If Datastore access is selected from the host level then the VNXe targets are added to all iSCSI initiators on ESX.

After these steps are completed VNXe starts creating the datastore, adding iSCSI targets to the selected ESX hosts and iSCSI initiators on those and finally mounts and creates the VMFS datastore.

 iSCSI datastore issues

After creating the first datastore I noticed from vCenter that there were “Add Internet SCSI send targets” and “Rescan all HBAs” tasks showing on the hosts that I selected to add the datastore to. After watching those tasks looping for 15 minutes and datastore not showing up on the ESXi servers I figured out that there was something wrong with the configuration.

I found out that the ESXi server had datastores connected also from other storage units that use CHAP authentication. On the ESXi iSCSI initiator the CHAP settings were set to “Inherit from parent” and that meant all the new targets would also inherit these CHAP settings. After disabling the inheritance the new datastore was connected and the VMFS datastore was created on it. I haven’t tried to use CHAP authentication with VNXe datastores so I don’t know if those settings are automatically configured to ESX. VNXe already has the ability to manipulate the ESX server configuration so I would imagine that it could also be possible to change the iSCSI target option to “Do not use CHAP” when VMware datastore is created on VNXe without CHAP authentication. Maybe in next the software version?

Another issue I had was that  a VMFS datastore was not always created during the process of creating a VMware datastore. VMware Storage Wizard on VNXe indicated that creating a VMware datastore is completed but actually the “create VMFS datastore” task was never initiated on the ESX. I’ve created over 20 datastores using this method and I would say that in about 50% of those cases the VMFS datastores were also created. Not a big thing, but still an annoying small glitch.

NFS datastore

Creating an NFS datastore is very similar to creating an iSCSI datastore. The only differences are steps 2 and 5 on the VMware Storage Wizard. On step 2 NFS is selected instead of VMFS (iSCSI). On this page there are two “hidden” advanced options: Deduplication and Caching. These options are hidden under the “Show advanced” link – similar to what criticized in iSCSI server configuration. In my opinion these should be shown by default.

On step 3 the same rule applies to selecting the NFS server as with the iSCSI server. The user has to manually balance the datastores between the SPs.

On step 5 datastore access (no access, read-only or read/write) will be chosen for the host or a specific ip address on host.

When all the steps on the wizard are done VNXe creates the datastore and mounts it to the selected host or hosts. I only gave one host access to this new NFS datastore but I could see that VNXe tried to do something NAS related to all the hosts in the Virtual Center connected to VNXe and gave some errors:

VSI

In a nutshell VSI Unified Storage Management (USM) is a plug-in that integrates with VMware vCenter and can be used to provision storage using vCenter UI. There is lots of good documentation on EMC Unified Storage Community and Powerlink so I’m not going to dig any deeper into it. VSI USM can be downloaded from Powerlink – Support – Software Downloads and Licensing – Downloads T-Z – Virtual Storage Integrator (VSI). I recommend reading the VSI USM Read Me First document to see what else needs to be installed to make the VSI plug-in work.

After the VSI USM plug-in and all the other needed packages have been installed the VNXe has to be connected to vCenter. This is done from vCenter Home – Solutions and Applications – EMC – Unified Storage Management – Add. A wizard will walk through the steps needed to connect vCenter and VNXe.

Now storage can be provisioned to a cluster or to an individual ESX host by right clicking cluster/host and selecting EMC – Unified Storage – Provision Storage.

The wizard follows the same steps as the VMware Storage Wizard when provisioning storage from VNXe.

Storage type:

Storage Array:

Storage Pool:

iSCSI Server:

Storage Details:

When using VSI to provision storage the iSCSI initiators and targets are configured automatically and VMFS datastore is also created in the process.

Conclusions

Again the suitable word to describe storage provisioning would be simple, if it would work every time. After provisioning several datastores I noticed that a VMFS datastore wasn’t always created when the iSCSI storage was provisioned from VNXe. Also there were issues if CHAP wasn’t used on VNXe but was used on ESX host for other datastores. This happens when using either VNXe or VSI storage provisioning.

Storage provisioning from VNXe is easy but it is even easier using VSI. When the initial setup is done, the iSCSI/NFS server configured and the storage pool(s) created there isn’t a need to login to VXNe anymore to provision storage if VSI is in use. This of course needs vCenter and all the necessary plug-ins to be installed.

Some users might never see these issues that I found out but for some these might be show stoppers. Not all businesses have vCenters in use so they have to use the Unisphere UI to provision storage and then the VMFS datastore might or might not be created. I can imagine how frustrated users can be when facing these kinds of issues.

Also, users shouldn’t  be responsible of the decision in which SP the new datastore is placed on. This should be something that VNXe decides.

Don’t take me wrong. The integration with VNXe and vCenter/ESX is smooth and it will be even better after these issues have been fixed.

In the next part of my hands-on series I will look into the performance of VNXe 3300 and I will also post some test statistics.


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